An Internet Fad We Can Finally Applaud

The inane (and often dangerous) internet fads that have made the rounds in recent years have ranged from silly (planking, Vadering) to lethal (choking game). But this week came news of the “mirror selfie,” whose instigator is Twitter user Seth Schneider. Schneider captured an image giving himself a high-five in the mirror while the phone, suspended in mid-air, snapped the picture. The blurry photo has been retweeted more than 170,000 times since Schneider posted it over the weekend.

Others quickly tried to take their own photos (the social network is nothing if not a vast experiment in encouraging lemming-like behavior), and some even claimed to have topped Schneider’s feat by dabbing during their photos:

Not every attempt ended well, of course. Many, many people ended up not with the perfect mid-action selfie, but with a shattered phone screen.

A writer for New York magazine gamely attempted to take one, with less than stellar results.

After multiple failed attempts yielded only a blurry picture of the top of her head, a reporter for CNET titled her piece about the experience: “I suck at this viral high-five selfie trend.”

The damage inflicted by failed selfie attempts has evidently been pervasive enough that Schneider added a sentence to his Twitter bio reading, “I am not responsible for any broken phones.”

No apologies needed; in fact, we applaud Schneider for starting this trend. Why? For one thing, it’s a viral trend performed largely in private, so public spaces that have only recently emptied out after the initial Pokémon Go craze won’t be repopulated by foolish viral selfie-takers like those annoying planking people. And second: many of these people will end up breaking their phones, preventing them from taking obnoxious selfies in the future. This is all for the good. So please, kids, try this at home.

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