What Happened to Video Games Based on Movies?

New Statesman

Wonder Woman is having an excellent week. The newly-released superhero blockbuster has earned $206.5m (£162.2m) in its first ten days in American theatres, and is now one of the highest-grossing movies ever made by a female director. There is no denying it: the film is a success.

Now imagine it’s 2002. After begging your mum to drive you to the local Blockbuster, you snatch the last rental copy of the DVD off the shelves and make your way to the counter, your blue and yellow membership card at the ready. But what do you see on your way? A brand new Wonder Woman video game, ready to get stuck into your PS2. With your popcorn-sticky fingers firmly wrapped around a rumbling controller, you were in for a pretty good night.

There was a time when every major movie had an accompanying tie-in game. After watching their counterparts on the silver screen, you were ten minutes of fiddling with some red, white, and yellow cables before you too could be Frodo battling for Middle Earth, James Bond sneaking past some Russians, or Harry Potter Flipendo-ing his way through the halls of Hogwarts.

Nowadays? Not so much. This month’s new reboots and releases The Mummy and Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales will not be accompanied by the console games that followed their original counterparts. Wonder Woman, too, won’t have a big-budget video game to call her own (she is, however, now available as a character in the DC Legends mobile game!)

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