• brad-pitt-angelina-jolie-maleficent-premiere-2014

    Mon. September 8

    Good Luck to Brangelina, Hollywood’s Coolest Parents

    R. J. Moeller

    After nine years and six children together, Hollywood’s preeminent power couple—Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie—got  married in a private ceremony in France late last month. Affectionately known to whoever reads US Weekly and watches Extra as “Brangelina,” Tinsel Town’s first family celebrated their nuptials with their children and twenty guests in a chapel at Château Miraval in the French village of Correns.

    A few interesting tidbits about the intimate ceremony… The children helped design mom’s wedding dress and contributed to the vows exchanged between their parents Jolie’s father—legendary actor Jon Voight—was not only not invited to the affair, but only first found out about it from the press They allowed their 10-year-old son Pax to bake the wedding cake Jolie wore a golden locket around her neck that belonged to her late mother, Marcheline Bertrand.

    As a strong proponent of the…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

    No Comments

  • Joan Rivers 1965

    Fri. September 5

    Joan Rivers’ Moral Clarity

    Abby W. Schachter

    Joan Rivers will be remembered for many things. The writer of jokes, the butt of jokes (especially about her plastic surgery habit), a feminist icon according to Camille Paglia, a horror-show to others, a merciless critic, a star with a wicked tongue. Here are two more: hard working and loyal.

    A 2010 documentary about Rivers’ life and career made plain how hard she worked and how seriously she took being funny. In the trailer we get a short clip of her extensive filing system of 3×5 index cards each with a joke and punchline. The drawers and cards represent every joke she ever wrote over more than four decades.

    Eulogizing the loss, Julie Klausner explains that rather than praise for her work ethic, Rivers was castigated. “Joan got a lot of shit for having the nerve to say “yes” to opportunities that came her way, from cruises to lecture circuits to dinky…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

    No Comments

  • 126903301

    Fri. September 5

    Teaching Kids to Respect Adults: What’s In A Name?

    R. J. Moeller

    “Respect for ourselves guides our morals; respect for others guides our manners”  ― Laurence Sterne

    A recent post at CafeMom.com’s “The Stir” blog by a mom named Judy Dutton posited the following contention: instructing your kids to call adults by “Mister”, “Missus,” or “Miss” has no tangible benefits for the development of your child’s personality or disposition.

    After sharing an anecdote about how another parent’s 3-year-old surprisingly addressed her as “Miss Dutton,” the blogger goes on to say

    So congratulations, parents of that 3-year-old, you’ve got a kid with an impressive parlor trick. Good manners in children are so rare these days, a little goes a long way. But while I admire your efforts, I won’t be emulating them. It’s quaint, and cute, but true respect runs deeper than a name—first, last, with or without Mr. or Ms.

    To…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

    No Comments

  • rs_634x863-140902104011-634.brad-pitt-angelina-hello-wedding

    Fri. September 5

    Angelina Jolie’s Wedding Dress: A Symbol of Family Love

    Chelsea Samelson

    So Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt finally, and quietly, tied the knot. So quietly, in fact, that the news came as a shock to almost everybody. But now, a week later, the biggest shock of all is Angelina’s wedding dress—the dress people can’t stop talking about. As one might expect from one of the wealthiest and well-known celebrities, Angelina Jolie’s dress was no ordinary dress.

    Designed by Luigi Massi of Versace, the full-skirt, floor-length, satin gown was stunning— it was classic, understated, and beautifully simple.

    Oh. And it was covered in crayon.

    Yes, Angelina Jolie walked down the aisle in a dress decked out in the doodles of her six children—everything from monsters, animals, and flowers were sewn onto her gown and veil.

    Many reacted with some degree of shock, disgust, or confusion. Some saw it as a tacky and gaudy publicity stunt. And for…

    Continue Reading >

    Fashion

    2 Comments

  • Untitled

    Thu. September 4

    Jennifer Lawrence: The Face That Launched 1,000 Hackers

    Mark Hemingway

    I know I might as well stamp “tragically unhip” on my forehead by admitting this, but right now I’m rereading The Iliad. You know, Homer. They made a movie of it with Brad Pitt a few years back? I just can’t get enough of dactylic hexameter! (I’m not kidding—it’s 600-page poem.)

    Anyway, plowing through a 2,800-year-old text is pretty revealing from a cultural standpoint. For one thing, The Iliad is violent as hell. It seems that every other line contains some gross description of someone’s head being lopped off and the bones spurting marrow or something else liable to make you say “ewww.” The Iliad also has quite a lot of sex, but unlike the violence, it contains nothing approaching explicit physical descriptions. So and so lays with so and so and that’s about it. At one point, Zeus is being seduced by Hera—the god…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

    1 Comment

  • Locke-poster

    Thu. September 4

    “Locke”: Risking Everything to Do the Right Thing

    Mark Tapson

    Though I was intrigued by its premise even before it appeared in theaters, I only just this weekend got around to watching Locke starring Tom Hardy, now out on DVD. You might think that an 80-minute movie featuring only one actor, who spends the entire film in his car driving and talking on a hands-free phone, would be at best a gimmicky curiosity and at worst a nap-inducing bore. You would be wrong. Locke is a riveting and affecting tale of a man risking everything to do the right thing.

    Hardy, last seen as Bane, Batman’s Darth Vader-y nemesis in The Dark Knight Rises, plays Ivan Locke, a Welsh Everyman in charge of laying the concrete foundation for one of the biggest construction projects in Europe. The film opens on Ivan climbing into his car at the end of a work day prior to the early morning pouring of the…

    Continue Reading >

    Movies

    No Comments

  • 1c0d693ba504584a42f4e74b4b4f3c86

    Thu. September 4

    Earth to Celebs: Keep Your Privates Private

    Ashley E. McGuire

    Maybe I am a cruel and heartless woman, but I don’t have sympathy for the celebrity women who had naked pics leaked to the public.

    I feel badly that celebrities probably feel like they don’t have a private life. But honestly, who does have a private life? Thanks to a Mr. Edward Snowden, we know that we are all hack material for the whims of Big Brother, or just some bitter ex working at the NSA. It’s unjust and unconstitutional, but everyone should assume that everything they put onto an electronic device is reviewed by someone, somewhere.

    Famous people are especially prone to hacking. How many times have we heard about some sex tape or naked photo being stolen?

    It’s a personal responsibility failure of epic proportions to make a sex tape or take a naked picture in today’s world. The failure level is heightened to behemoth…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

    1 Comment

  • 119696364

    Wed. September 3

    The Importance of Dad

    R. J. Moeller

    “I’m glad to know my involvement is a good thing. But that’s not why I spend time with my kids. I do it because I like it.”

    Those pleasant sentiments were expressed by Paul Raeburn, the author of Do Fathers Matter?, a brand-new book on the important role that fathers play in the lives of their children.

    From Vox.com:

    A science writer who’d published books on mental illness and space exploration, Raeburn did a comprehensive survey of scientific research on fatherhood. The result is his newest book, Do Fathers Matter? Raeburn found that fathers play a huge role in their children’s lives, even before they’re born.

    Raeburn’s book is written in the format of a timeline chronicling a child’s conception, birth, and childhood. At each stage of development, the author pauses to reveal the findings of his research. And at…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

    1 Comment

  • Jennifer-Lawrence

    Wed. September 3

    Celebgate and the End of Privacy

    Melanie Wilcox

    By now, most of you have probably heard about how a hacker leaked hundreds of nude photos of famous female celebrities, including Jennifer Lawrence and Kate Upton, on a website called 4chan, an image-based “bulletin board” where anyone can post comments and share images.

    Nobody knows how the hacker, who has yet to be caught, obtained the photos.  Initially, iCloud took the heat for a supposed glitch in the system, but after a thorough overview, the company said that its services, including iCloud and Find My Phone, were not breached.  Instead, Apple inferred on Tuesday that the hacker planned “a very targeted attack”—one in which he was able to obtain user names, passwords, and security questions.

    The FBI has been “addressing” the “unlawful release of material involving high profile individuals” and Apple, according to a statement the company released on Tuesday, has been working with law enforcement to help…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture, Tech

    1 Comment

  • article-2706125-1FFA1D7600000578-748_634x631

    Tue. September 2

    In Defense of Public Breastfeeding

    Ashley E. McGuire

    Usually celebrity “statements” via Instagram or what-have-you annoy me. Not so with celebrity women taking to the Internet to promote public breastfeeding.

    Gwen Stefani was the most recent to do so, posting an absolutely lovely picture of herself relaxing at a rest stop in the Swiss Alps nursing her five-month old son. There was no flesh. Nothing in your face about it. Just a happy-looking and relaxed mother feeding her baby.

    For sure, people can get way over the top about breastfeeding. Nanny Bloomberg was way out of line when he made New York City hospitals put formula under lock and key. Formula is not poison. A recent study found that while breastfeeding cuts a woman’s odds of developing postpartum depression in half, women who want to breastfeed but can’t are twice as likely to develop the post-baby blues. No doubt increased pressure on women to nurse contributes to a…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

    1 Comment

THE DAILY SCENE

ACCULTURATED BOOK SERIES

Acculturated Book Series

TWITTER

Top Stories

PODCASTS

Staff Writers