• ap_trump_supporters_04_jc_151208_12x5_1600

    Fri. February 5

    What Kind of Male Role Model Would a President Trump Be?

    Mark Tapson

    No one in the public eye is currently driving more media attention and polarized debate than presidential aspirant, reality TV star, and billionaire real estate mogul Donald Trump. His arrogance inspires rabid admiration and visceral disgust in equal measure. Many are horrified by the prospect that, as President, the bullying Trump might prove to be a Putin-style authoritarian; many find that same cocky aggressiveness to be electrifyingly, refreshingly virile. This raises an interesting, overlooked question: As a man, what kind of a role model would a President Trump be for our sons?

    In her recent City Journal article “Coarsener in Chief,” Heather MacDonald addresses that very question. She is not a fan; after condemning Trump as “the most gratuitously nasty public figure that this country has seen in living memory” and “the very definition of a bully,” she urges his conservative supporters to consider Trump’s “effect on civilized mores”:

    Continue Reading >

    Celebrities, Culture

  • amy-schumer-live-at-the-apollo

    Fri. February 5

    Did Amy Schumer Get a Pass for Stealing Jokes because She’s a Woman?

    R. J. Moeller

    Comedian Amy Schumer, the most popular funny person in America today, had a prolific run in 2015. After years of honing her craft as a respected stand-up in comedy clubs around the country, the past 12 to 18 months have been banner ones for the Long Island, NY native. A hit cable television show. A summer blockbuster movie. Party vacations with movie stars and photo spreads in the nation’s biggest magazines.

    The first few weeks of 2016 have not been as kind.

    From Vox.com:

    But Schumer now faces an allegation that undermines her recent success: She’s being called a plagiarist — a joke stealer. 

    The piece continues:

    Over Martin Luther King Day weekend three female comedians — Kathleen Madigan, Wendy Liebman, and Tammy Pescatelli — alleged, through their Twitter accounts, that Schumer stole their jokes and presented them as her own. Because Twitter is a fickle beast, the tweets have been deleted.…

    Continue Reading >

    Celebrities

  • Happy  smiling friends drinking beer at counter in pub

    Fri. February 5

    If You Want a Stress-Free Guy, Give Him a Boy’s Night Out

    Mark Judge

    It’s healthy and good for men to go out as a group, act like animals, and exclude women from the fun.

    Male bonding without women, or what one British journalist calls “lad’s night out,” is an essential part of male well-being. Both feminists who hector men to spend every moment with them—making sure all activities are of equal time—and conservatives who argue that a man’s entire life should revolve around his family, are both presenting ideas that are harmful to men.

    Men need nights when they go out and rage with their buds. It’s as necessary to us as fresh air and sex. That was the finding of a group of German scientists, who published their findings in 2014. Scientists from the University of Gottingen studied groups of Barbary macaques, a type of ape which exhibits human-like social behavior. Researchers found that levels of male…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

  • dubWall

    Fri. February 5

    My Dubsmash, Myself

    Acculturated Editor

    Yesterday Jennifer Lopez and her boyfriend Casper Smart made a video in which they appear in bed (with JLo makeup-free, itself a newsworthy event) and engage in a brief “white girl anthem” parody, making fun of Starbucks and Chipotle and yoga pants.

     

    # #dubsmash #starbucks #chipotle #yogapants #morestarbucks #yasssss #whitegirlsanthem

    A video posted by B Smart (@beaucaspersmart) on Feb 2, 2016 at 4:51pm PST

     

    They used an app called Dubsmash, which allows its users to “create short selfie videos dubbed with famous sounds” with their mobile phones.  If you haven’t heard about Dubsmash, then allow this father to introduce you to a more elaborate use of the app:

     

    Dubsmash is our era’s answer to karaoke.  But…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

  • 1127604821615898178

    Thu. February 4

    Why the ‘Conan the Barbarian’ Sequel Should Focus on Fatherhood

    Jack Butler

    “So, did Conan return the wayward daughter of King Osric to her home. And having no further concern, he and his companions sought adventure in the West. Many wars and feuds did Conan fight. Honor and fear were heaped upon his name. In time he became a king by his own hand. . . .  And this story shall also be told.”

    Thus ends Conan the Barbarian, the 1982 John Millius film that launched Arnold Schwarzenegger’s career. The movie portrayed orphan-turned-slave-turned-pit-fighter-turned-freeman Conan’s epic revenge quest against Thulsa Doom (James Earl Jones), the reptilian warlock who murdered his family. Thirty-four years ago, audiences were promised a sequel with Conan as an aged king. Instead, movies unworthy of the original followed: an action comedy in 1984, and a misguided reboot in 2011. Hope for a proper sequel that made good on this incredible tease seemed lost.

    Until now.

    Recently, Arnold Schwarzenegger revealed…

    Continue Reading >

    Movies

  • iStock_000014148807_Small

    Thu. February 4

    Elites’ Latest Mantra: “Let Them Eat Broccoli!”

    Julie Gunlock

    There are an awful lot of excuses out there for why poor people have bad diets and why poor kids tend to be more obese than middle class and affluent kids. What’s rarely mentioned is bad parenting.

    Common excuses range from the dearth of grocery stores in urban areas (a myth—see here) and the prevalence of fast food restaurants in poor communities (a myth—studies show the poor eat in restaurants infrequently). First lady Michelle Obama likes to promote the idea that unhealthy school lunches are to blame for kids’ growing girth (another myth—school food was gross and unhealthy long before childhood obesity reached “crisis” levels).

    And now we have a new excuse. According to Joe Pinsker at The Atlantic, it’s the fact that low income parents can’t afford to do what academics say is required to get kids to eat their peas and carrots—repetition, dedication to…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

  • Lloyd-Boom-Box

    Thu. February 4

    In Defense of Romantic Comedies

    Bethany Mandel

    Let me establish this from the outset: I am a social science truther. A non-believer. I simply don’t believe that social science is able to properly quantify and measure social phenomena, experiences, or feelings in most instances. As well, given the overwhelmingly liberal bias of most social scientists working on university campuses, one has to wonder how they are able to come to a definitive conclusion on a science so imprecise. There’s a term for it: confirmation bias. It’s when you’ve already decided upon your conclusion before conducting an experiment.

    One recently released study exemplifies the confirmation bias researchers have from the outset. At the University of Michigan, scientists set out to determine if romantic comedies warped women’s view of “aggressive” men who won’t take no for an answer.

    If you are the kind of person who views dramatic romantic gestures in films as…

    Continue Reading >

    Movies

  • Balang-Justin-Bieber-Sorry-020216-640x457

    Thu. February 4

    Selfsploitation

    Acculturated Editor

    A video of a chubby young man rocking out to a Justin Bieber song has been making the rounds on the Internet this week:

    //

    Sorry by Justin Bieber Dance Cover ☺️☺️ #Sorry

    Posted by John Phillip Bughaw aka Balang on Saturday, January 30, 2016

     

    The video has nearly 13 million views on Facebook.

    Awkward-kid-dancing is by now such a familiar Internet trope that it’s practically a cliché (remember Star Wars Kid?) But the endings for these videos aren’t always happy ones. Star Wars Kid (who never intended the video to be seen publicly) was harassed and even told to commit suicide by vicious online commenters and his own classmates. Ten years later, he spoke out about the effects this cyberbullying had on him.

    Seven-year-old John Phillip Bughaw, by contrast, is no novice, and seems happy to have the attention; he appeared on the Ellen DeGeneres Show last year—twice, where he talked…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

  • jopfjdvgopjkb

    Wed. February 3

    ‘Peter Rabbit’ vs. ‘Polar Bear’s Underwear’: The Revenge of the Classics

    Julia Dent

    More than 70 years after her death, Beatrix Potter has a new book coming out in September to coincide with the 150th anniversary of her birth. The long-lost manuscript of The Tale of Kitty-In-Boots, which will be illustrated by Quentin Blake (the wonderful illustrator of Roald Dahl’s book), is already a bestseller. Potter, most famous for the well-loved classic The Tale of Peter Rabbit, seems to have worked on the manuscript for The Tale of Kitty-In-Boots in 1914, but stopped when her publisher didn’t seem keen on her idea. So the manuscript stayed unpublished until it was discovered in 2013.

    Why is a children’s book written in 1914 already gaining such a cult following?

    Potter’s “new” book isn’t the first to gain posthumous popularity; last year, Laura Ingalls Wilder’s annotated autobiography Pioneer Girl sold like hot cakes. Perhaps these classics are so popular because they are full of timeless morals and…

    Continue Reading >

    Books

  • Statue-2

    Wed. February 3

    Creeping Totalitarianism at Harvard

    Mark Tapson

    In 1987, Allan Bloom’s bestselling book The Closing of the American Mind described how higher education was failing our students and “impoverishing their souls.” Bloom doubted that our colleges and universities could ever reestablish the ideal of a classically liberal education. Sadly, even as academically esteemed an institution as Harvard seems to be proving that Bloom’s skepticism was well-founded.

    In a recent interview with political pundit William Kristol, former Harvard President Lawrence Summers complained that a “creeping totalitarianism” is casting a pall over our institutions of higher learning, Harvard included. As administrators and students obsess over safe spaces and microaggressions, educational excellence is being degraded by a “growing preference for emotional comfort over academic inquiry.” Schools are coddling a generation of militantly sensitive students while promoting a politically correct orthodoxy that stifles intellectual freedom.

    In one example Summers mentions, “Holiday Placemats for Social Justice” appeared in a Harvard undergraduate dining…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture