• Untitled1

    Fri. August 29

    Athletes Are People Too

    R. J. Moeller

    Having recently passed Major League Baseball’s trade deadline—where last-minute deals send beloved players off to new organizations in hopes of making a World Series run—fans in cities like Boston and Tampa were treated to one of sports’ sentimental treats: the full-page ad.

    From the Huffington Post:

    Jon Lester made a classy move by taking a full-page ad traded him to Oakland on the day of the non-waiver trade deadline, also thanked the organization and said “Boston will always be my home.”

    Meanwhile, some 1,400 miles to the south, fans of the Tampa Bay Rays were presented with a similar thanks offering from one of that franchise’s best players in their brief existence.

    Former Rays ace David Price is set to make his Tigers’ debut Tuesday night, but he’s far from forgotten his time with the Tampa Bay ballclub. Tuesday, he took out a full-page ad in the Tampa Bay Times.

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    Sports

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  • 180247019

    Fri. August 29

    Privacy and Self-Image on the Internet: Does It Really Matter?

    Gracy Olmstead

    The Internet has made all our information available online, to an often surprising degree. A cursory web search can reveal personal pictures, links to relatives’ social media profiles, random and sundry acts committed or things written over the years. Anything posted on the web remains there, open and raw, for the entire world to see.

    However, in May, the European Court of Justice ruled that “private citizens may request that search engines remove erroneous, inadequate, or irrelevant links from their results,” thus providing students with “the right to be forgotten,” according to Popular Science. Within the first four days that Google said it would accept removal requests, it received more than 41,000. Who knows what all this content was: perhaps some was merely outdated, while other content was personal or embarrassing. But a multitude of users believed the Internet held harmful, frustrating, or annoying information about them—information they’d prefer remained…

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    Culture

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  • 165236723

    Thu. August 28

    In Defense of Bake Sales

    R. J. Moeller

    Those who can, do; those who can’t, ban bake sales. Or so it would seem from the recent developments in the insulated, top-down world of the American public education system.

    At Chapman School in Nebraska, resourceful students hawk pizza and cookie dough to raise money for school supplies, field trips, and an eighth-grade excursion to Washington. They peddle chocolate bars to help fund the yearbook.

    But the sales won’t be so sweet starting this fall. Campus bake sales—a mainstay of school fundraisers—are going on a diet. A federal law that aims to curb childhood obesity means that, in dozens of states, bake sales must adhere to nutrition requirements that could replace cupcakes and brownies with fruit cups and granola bars.

    While taking a break from solving serious societal woes that negatively effect education in this country—such as rampant out-of-wedlock birth rates, ballooning student debt, and the…

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    Culture

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  • Untitled

    Thu. August 28

    Girl Power?

    Melanie Wilcox

    All eyes were on Sofia Vergara at the 66th Annual Emmy Awards as the 42-year-old actress from Colombia took center stage to introduce the TV Academy’s chairman, Bruce Rosenblum.  Before he walked on the stage, Vergara said, “I came to America with a big dream, and this dream … it was the same dream that so many women of my generation had, to be one day on a stage just like this … introducing the CEO and Chairman of the Television Academy…”

    Out walked Bruce Rosenblum, who made some remarks about the organization’s philanthropic and educational goals—remarks that normally would encourage viewers to channel surf, check their phones, or grab a snack in the kitchen.  But not this time.

    Eyes were glued to the screen as the President led the Modern Family actress to a platform—a pedestal—that rotated with the flick of a switch.  As Vergara primped and preened,…

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    Culture

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  • gov7ysyiqaq04q0ijjcb

    Wed. August 27

    The ‘Insidious’ Threat of Benevolent Sexism

    Mark Tapson

    Recently on the Fox News show Outnumbered, the always-outspoken KISS bassist Gene Simmons scoffed at a 2012 study posted on Medium.com which warned of “the insidious nature of benevolent sexism” and the hidden dangers of holding a door open for a woman.

    Dr. Stephen Franzoi and Dr. Debra Oswald, professors of psychology at Marquette University, co-wrote the study entitled “Experiencing Sexism and Young Women’s Body Esteem,” about how young women’s body esteem is affected by both hostile and “benevolent” sexism from family members and everyday experiences.

    If you have been blissfully ignorant of benevolent sexism, it’s been central to feminist theory since the late 1990s. The Marquette University study explains that benevolent sexism is characterized “by beliefs and actions that appear outwardly positive, but actually undermine gender equality.” It is “subtler” than “hostile sexism”, its more extreme partner, which consists of open acts or policies of gender discrimination,…

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    Culture

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  • 450606313

    Wed. August 27

    Handwritten Thank You Notes: In or Out?

    Melanie Wilcox

    Is the post-job interview handwritten thank you note outdated?  That answer depends on who you ask.  Five recruiting, etiquette, and H.R. professionals shared their view on this matter in an article with LearnVest.  The answer, it seems, depends on several factors—industry, age of interviewer, timeliness of letter arrival, and content, of course.

    Professionals in the tech field are less inclined to favor thank you notes as opposed to professionals in more creative and team-oriented fields.  For example, Kathy Harris, Managing Director at Harris Allied, an executive search firm specializing in the technology industry, says that thank you notes will hurt job applicants. “The handwritten thank-you note has gone the way of the horse and carriage,” she says.  Furthermore, an applicant will “risk appearing irrelevant” since “tech people embrace email” and that it’s “part of the protocol.”

    Bonnie Zaben, C.O.O. of AC Lion, a digital media recruiting firm,…

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    Culture

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  • 507060009

    Tue. August 26

    Twitter Fails and Faux Pas: Summer 2014 Edition

    R. J. Moeller

    I love Twitter, and I’m not ashamed to say it. I’m a grown man with a beard who owns a small business and I love Twitter. I really do. Now, before you smugly say something like, “Well if you love it so much, why don’t you marry it?” please read this previous piece about how I met and married my wife Whitney because of Twitter.

    While Twitter can be a magical networking and news-following resource, we’re all aware of social media’s many pitfalls and snares. Freedom, even of the World Wide Web variety, isn’t free. There are the Twitter party fouls that can land you in deep legal trouble, but, just because something isn’t criminally enforced doesn’t mean you won’t suffer for saying or doing the wrong thing online.

    As Walter Sobchak so eloquently put it in The Big Lebowski: “This…

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    Culture

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  • 494381849

    Tue. August 26

    Who Wears the Chef Pants?

    Ashley E. McGuire

    I recently thumbed through a Relais & Châteaux book advertising some of the world’s finest hotels and restaurants. The book included a section where some of the world’s most famous chefs suggest a short tour of a region’s best eateries. All of them were men.

    I’m no foodie, but I am familiar enough with celebrity chefs and many of their restaurants. It struck me: I couldn’t name a single female head chef if my life depended on it. Nor have I ever once seen a woman chef featured in any profile of fine dining.

    Yet we still associate cooking and the kitchen with women. Men increasingly cook and bake, but it almost always seems to be for leisure, not for necessity. Exceptionally rare, it seems, is the man who gets dinner on the table for his family.

    This is despite the fact that many…

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    Culture

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  • 155399322

    Mon. August 25

    Is Chivalry Too Risky?

    Mark Tapson

    The word “chivalry” brings to mind heroic images of a knight in shining armor riding to the defense of a damsel in distress. We don’t usually consider the possibility that things may go badly for the would-be rescuer.

    Earlier this month, a 39-year-old Texan visiting Philadelphia was out in the wee hours of the morning when he saw several men inside a car pull up next to a group of women, whom they began taunting and catcalling. A police captain later reported that the visitor “took offense to something that the guys were saying to the girls and said ‘Hey, watch what you’re saying.’”

    At that point, one of the men inside the vehicle got out and punched the Good Samaritan, who fell and struck his head on the concrete, knocking him unconscious. The suspects then fled and the victim ended up in the hospital. “This is a…

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    Culture

    71 Comments

  • IMG_1290

    Mon. August 25

    ‘The Birthday Boys’: Sketch Comedy at its Best

    Mark Hemingway

    I used to love sketch comedy. It seemed so “edgy,” back in the day when that word could be used without irony. Of course, now every no-account college kid is in an improv troupe and I’ve got kids in private school. Sorry chuckles, but I have zero desire to pony up for the two drink minimum to watch you embarrass the ghost of Del Close.

    So I’m happy to report that The Birthday Boys has given me considerable hope that sketch comedy is not dead yet. It’s the first genuinely great American sketch comedy show since HBO unjustly cancelled Mr. Show 16 years ago. (Not coincidentally, Mr. Show’s Bob Odenkirk, better known these days as Saul Goodman from Breaking Bad, is the show’s producer and a frequent guest star.)

    So what makes The Birthday Boys so great? Well, fire up Netflix, where the first and only…

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    Television

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