• kanye-west-poster

    Mon. September 22

    Kanye West: The Worst Human Being In Entertainment?

    R. J. Moeller

    Rapper Kanye West is quite possibly the most obnoxious personality in the entertainment business today. His talent is legitimate. His industry accolades and financial successes are fairly earned. But the guy cannot help but be the unnecessary instigator, agitator, and bully in almost any room he enters. Whether it involves being unable to take a Jimmy Kimmel joke, or the perceived slights he’s allegedly received from Italian clothing designers, West feels the inconsolable need to lash out and do what he can to humiliate the “haters” in his midst.

    During a recent tour stop in Sydney, Australia, Mr. West urged the crowd to uniformly stand on their feet before he would continue the concert. The only exception that would be allowed was if one of his fans possessed, “a handicap pass where you get special parking and sh$%.”

    From The Hollywood Reporter:

    [West] boasted about being able to spot…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture, Music

    No Comments

  • 1403714043000-USP-NFL-2014-NFL-Draft

    Fri. September 19

    How to Save Football

    Mark Judge

    Fewer games. Fewer pads. Weight limits.

    It wouldn’t be hard to save professional football in America. We just have to acknowledge reality, which can be hard to do when you’re dealing with something that is so emotional to so many people and that brings in such huge revenue. Saving the NFL is like trying to set Justin Bieber on the right course to avoid drugs and prison: the solutions are fairly obvious, but no one wants to be the one to step forward and do it.  When there’s a football franchise-amount of money involved, it unfortunately means that human beings often become expendable. Just ask Janay Palmer Rice. Her husband, ex-Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, infamously hit her so hard he knocked her out. Before the public outcry, the league initially suspended Rice for two games.

    But at least the NFL has now stepped up and…

    Continue Reading >

    Sports

    No Comments

  • the-skeleton-twins02

    Fri. September 19

    The Best Love Stories Don’t Involve Sex

    Katrina Trinko

    The newly-released film by writer/director Craig Johnson The Skeleton Twins shows that the best love stories can be platonic.  The film chronicles the relationship of long-estranged twin brother and sister Milo and Maggie, played by Saturday Night Live veterans Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig, who reunite after Milo attempts to commit suicide.

    “In its structure and rhythms, The Skeleton Twins often gestures at the conventions (and some of the clichés) of romantic comedy,” writes Slate movie critic Dana Stevens.

    But Twins does more than present “a rom com that’s refreshingly free of rom,” to use the punchy expression of a Slate headline writer. It also challenges one of the most-entrenched beliefs in our culture: that we can choose who we are.

    After all, if family is the ultimate collection of people we didn’t choose to live with, romantic relationships are the exact opposite: they’re about the people…

    Continue Reading >

    Movies

    No Comments

  • Pope Francis Holds His Weekly Audience

    Fri. September 19

    The Significance of the Pope Francis Weddings

    Melanie Wilcox

    Pope Francis presided over the wedding ceremony of twenty couples in Rome this past weekend. It was the first time that he witnessed the exchange of marriage vows as Pontiff, deservedly making it the wedding of the Century.

    It has also become a topic of controversy because one of the grooms had been divorced, received an annulment from the Church, and his now-wife has a daughter from a previous relationship.  Several of the other couples had been living together.  Catholic teaching views sex outside of marriage as sinful and calls cohabitation “objectively, morally wrong.”

    The ceremony has taken place just weeks before the October Synod, where bishops will meet at the Vatican to discuss the following topic: “Pastoral Challenges of the Family in the Context of Evangelization.”  The topic was determined based on the survey results from bishops, who have observed that many Christians have difficulty accepting Catholic social teachings…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

    No Comments

  • AA006090

    Thu. September 18

    In Defense of Home-Cooked Meals

    Mark Tapson

    Slate.com recently posted a curiously useless, sour article with the hyperbolic title The Tyranny of the Home-Cooked Meal. That’s right, tyranny. So cooking is the new Communism, and mothers, your family are the new Stalins.*

    Columnist Amanda Marcotte asserts that the home-cooked meal has become “the hallmark of good mothering, stable families, and the ideal of the healthy, productive citizen,” which is overstating it, but yes, a good home-cooked meal is certainly, and rightfully, regarded very positively—except by Ms. Marcotte and North Carolina State University sociologists, who complain in a recent study that too many mothers don’t have the time or money to live up to that ideal.

    The researchers interviewed 150 mothers “from all walks of life” (although only the middle class and below are discussed) and found that “even for middle-class working mothers who are able to be home by 6 p.m., trying to cook…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

    1 Comment

  • taylor-swift-lena-dunham-had-girls-moment-during-globes

    Thu. September 18

    Taylor Swift’s “Feminist Awakening”

    Ashley E. McGuire

    Oh, good. Lena Dunham is helping Taylor Swift to “understand feminism.”

    In a recent interview with The Guardian, the singer-songwriter confessed to a “feminist awakening” which she attributes to her newfound friendship with the creator of the soft-porn HBO series, Girls. She said:

    As a teenager, I didn’t understand that saying you’re a feminist is just saying that you hope women and men will have equal rights and equal opportunities. What it seemed to me, the way it was phrased in culture, society, was that you hate men. And now, I think a lot of girls have had a feminist awakening because they understand what the word means. For so long it’s been made to seem like something where you’d picket against the opposite sex, whereas it’s not about that at all. Becoming friends with Lena—without her preaching to me, but just seeing why she believes what she believes, why…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

    2 Comments

  • THE DROP

    Wed. September 17

    ‘The Drop’: The Best Movie of the Year

    R. J. Moeller

    The best movie that I have seen thus far in 2014 is The Drop, starring Tom Hardy and the late, great James Gandolfini in one of his final onscreen roles. Directed by Academy Award nominated Michael R. Roskam and written by  Dennis Lehane (Mystic River, Gone Baby Gone), The Drop tells the sobering tale of two cousins that run a “drop bar”—a place where nefarious characters transfer cash to one another—controlled by Chechen gangsters in Brooklyn.

    Not only does this movie have superb acting from Hardy and Gandolfini, but it has cute puppies, an emotionally-damaged damsel in distress, and a unique take on the “Hero or anti-hero?” line that many films before it have walked.

    Hardy plays the reserved, ruminating bartender Bob Saginowski whose older cousin Marvin (Gandolfini) once ran a local criminal outfit when they were younger men. The memories of past crimes and personal loss haunt Bob,…

    Continue Reading >

    Movies

    2 Comments

  • Beyonce-and-Jay-Z-Close-Up-Beyonce-Drunk-in-Love-Wallpapers-1920x1080-WideWallpapersHD

    Wed. September 17

    Beyoncé’s Theology of the Body

    Mark Judge

    Sometimes a piece of pop culture becomes a work of deep spirituality and even art, pushing past formula and touching something timeless and holy.

    Such is the case with “Drunk in Love,” the song by Beyoncé off her most recent, self-titled album. The song has been out for a while, but I came to have an entirely new appreciation for it due to a book I’m reading. The book is Called to Love: Approaching John Paul II’s Theology of the Body by Carl Anderson and Fr. Jose Granados.

    For the past several decsades of the Cultural Revolution, conservatives and liberals have been at odds, perhaps no more so than on matters of human sexuality. The left says that our bodies are good and that sex is an essential need, and also fun. Conservatives argue that, while sex is indeed good, if not treated with the proper respect for…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture, Music

    1 Comment

  • 177540479

    Tue. September 16

    The Books We Love and What They Say About Us

    Gracy Olmstead

    A new status has been popping up on Facebook lately, and it’s not, surprisingly enough, more #IceBucketChallenge posts. Instead, users are sharing their “top 10 books.” The status usually prompts participants to list 10 books that have “stayed with them” in some way. It encourages people to answer the prompt quickly, without over-analyzing the question; to simply list the first books that pop into their heads.

    Facebook responded to the outpouring of statuses that followed by assembling some rather interesting data on users’ favorite books. They found that books users most liked seemed clustered in groups, according to genre. They also assembled a list of the most-liked books amongst users: Harry Potter series – J.K. Rowling To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen The Holy Bible The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy…

    Continue Reading >

    Books

    No Comments

  • 84521492

    Tue. September 16

    The Real Joy of Family Cooking

    Abby W. Schachter

    Is making dinner for your family so burdensome to women that it should best be described as tyranny? According to a trio of sociologists and at least one progressive, feminist writer, it sure seems that way.

    Amanda Marcotte, who writes regularly for Slate, recently highlighted a study by Sarah Bowen, Sinikka Elliott, and Joslyn Brenton called The Joy of Cooking? in which the authors describe the act of cooking for your family as “filled with time pressures, tradeoffs ….and the burden of pleasing others.” The sociologists conducted a teensy bit of research by observing a handful of subjects, and concluded that the “emerging standard [of healthy, home-cooked, and shared dinner meals] is a tasty illusion, one that is moralistic and rather elitist, instead of a realistic vision of cooking today. Intentionally or not, it places the burden of a healthy home-cooked meal on women.”

    What exactly are these terrible burdens…

    Continue Reading >

    Culture

    No Comments

THE DAILY SCENE

ACCULTURATED BOOK SERIES

Acculturated Book Series

TWITTER

Top Stories

PODCASTS

Staff Writers